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While ebooks are pretty common these days and where information can be readily found with a few clicks of the mouse and a few strokes on the keyboard, there is still the need for libraries where tons of reference books can still be found, plus sometimes asking a knowledgeable librarian for help can sometimes yield better results than a Google search. That being said, Google seems to understand the importance of libraries and librarians because they have announced a partnership with...

What does it take to move your child from consumer to producer of technology? Today’s kids are often chastised for playing too many video games, texting too much or spending too much time on social media. So how can we leverage their interest in technology to encourage them to become the makers and producers—the game designers, programmers and innovators? The simple answer is computer science education. Not All Screen Time Is Created Equal Most kids today know how to use a computer or...

When I first heard that coding was to become a part of the new school curriculum in BC, I thought the idea was a bit esoteric. Flashbacks of learning how to code in my first-year computer science class in university reminded me of my disinterest in programming, and my belief that it was a skill that I would never use. But that was before technology had become such an integral part of life. In a roundtable discussion that I attended a few...

There are six kits available: Explorer, Explorer Pro, Light Wizard, Science Lab, Smart Life and All-in-One. Each is equipped with basic blocks like a light sensor and adjustment knob, with the different kits featuring specialized blocks geared toward a child's interests, like cold cathode, WiFi and camera blocks. Others include a voice sensor, Bluetooth, ultrasonic and display module. Once your kit is set up, you can program it using Makeblock's mBlock, a graphical and flow-based programming system, with "no prior coding...

From the lowest to the highest elementary grade levels, children gazed at the figures on the screen, talked with nearby peers and made decisions to continue the game forward. In recognition of the global “Hour of Code” last week, every class at Haynes Elementary School took time — about an hour — playing games based on writing computer code. In a game called “Candy Quest,” part of the “Tynker” program website, kindergarten and prekindergarten students learned to maneuver their customized avatars to...